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Can Dogs Eat Apples? | Human Foods Dogs Can Eat

Have you ever been enjoying a snack and looked down to see two longing eyes staring back up at you? If you have a dog, then I’m almost positive your answer is yes. In a perfect world, we would be able to share whatever we’re eating with our pups. After all, sharing is caring and a little taste of “people food” can make your dog’s day. It’s a wonderful feeling, but it shouldn’t come at the expense of our pets’ health and well-being. So I sat down and did a bunch of research. It took me longer than I’d like to admit, but I wanted to be thorough. I came up with this list of “people foods” and whether or not it’s safe (or smart) to share them with your dog. It’s quite long, so feel free to search for a specific food or use the quick navigation to jump to your desired category inspired by the food pyramid.

Just a quick note: This is a work in progress so I will be updating this periodically. Right now, I have a list of fruits. I will be adding more categories shortly.


Fruits

Can dogs eat apples? Yes! (but NOT the seeds or core)

Apples can be used as a sweet treat for your dog with added health benefits. Apples are low in calories and contain vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, dietary fiber, and antioxidants. Their crunchy texture can also help clean your dog’s teeth and keep her breath smelling fresh! (But you should still brush her teeth every day).

Keep in mind that every dog is different, so your dog may have trouble digesting apples. Try giving her a little bit at first and monitor her reaction. If her tummy doesn’t get upset, then you have the go ahead to use apple slices as a cheap, healthy snack. However, always feed fruits in moderation; the abundance of fiber can be difficult on the digestive system causing loose stool.

WARNING: Always get rid of the seeds, stem, and core of the apple before feeding it to your dog. They can be choking hazards and the seeds contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs.


Can dogs eat apricots? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

The pits, stems, and leaves of apricots are NOT safe for dogs, but the flesh is ok. It is rich in nutrients like potassium, fiber, and beta-carotene, which are all beneficial to your pup. However, like other fruits, the abundance of fiber can cause an upset stomach so it’s better to do small bits at a time.

WARNING: The pits, stems, and leaves of apricots contain cyanide (much more than apples), which is toxic to dogs. The pits are also a choking hazard. Always remove the pits if you are going to feed your dog pieces of apricots.

The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include difficulty breathing, panting, shock, dilated pupils, red mucous membranes (eg gums), and death. If you think your dog has consumed a pit, contact your veterinarian and watch out for these signs.


Can dogs eat avocado? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

There is a rumor that avocados are unsafe for dogs and cats. Its basis comes from the presence of persin, a substance that is harmful to other animals, including horses, cattle, goats, rabbits, and birds, but it has never been shown to be toxic to dogs or cats.

Actually, avocados contain a lot of nutrients that can keep your dogs healthy, including essential fatty acids, folate, niacin, potassium, fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin B6, and antioxidants. It can do wonders for your dog’s skin and coat health. Avocados are even used as ingredients in some dog foods. However, like any other fruit, you should feed in moderation as some dogs have trouble digesting plants.

WARNING: Avocado pits are a choking hazard! And because they are so big, they can cause an obstruction in the digestive tract, which can lead to death. If your dog consumes the pit, take her to the vet!


Can dogs eat bananas? Yes!

Bananas are delicious and healthy for your dog. Some nutrients they contain include vitamin B6, vitamin C, fiber, potassium, biotin, and magnesium. These are great for muscle-building and boosting immunities. Bananas are low in cholesterol and sodium, however, they are high in sugar so moderation is key. Dogs don’t always digest plants well, so if your dog likes bananas, just give her a few slices every now and then so you don’t upset her tummy.


Can dogs eat blackberries? Yes!

What an awesome treat blackberries are for dogs! Blackberries are close to my heart. When they ripen in the summer, my dog and I go to the park to run and swim and pick blackberries. She loves them (and so do I)! They are full of juicy deliciousness as well as antioxidants, fiber, vitamins (A, C, E, and K), folate, manganese, and omega-3 fatty acids. Don’t feed your dog too many, though, because she can get an upset tummy.


Can dogs eat blueberries? Yes!

Blueberries are another great option as a sweet treat for your dog. They are the perfect size (so you can give her a couple) and they contain some great nutrients. They are rich in antioxidants, vitamin C, vitamin K, phytochemicals, and fiber. You dog will stay healthy and strong with a little boost from a few blueberries. You’ll often find them as an ingredient in dog foods as well. Remember to feed fruits in moderation as too much can cause an upset stomach.


Can dogs eat cantaloupe? Yes! (but NOT the seeds)

Cantaloupe is a cool, refreshing treat on a hot day for humans and dogs. It provides great nutrients such as vitamins (A, B-complex, C), potassium, magnesium, beta-carotene, fiber, and folic acid. As I’ve said before, fruit can be difficult for dogs to digest so feed in moderation. A small cube (1” x 1”) make a great sized treat.

WARNING: Cantaloupe seeds (like other fruits) contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. Be sure to scrap out all of the seeds and only feed your dog the flesh of the cantaloupe.


Can dogs eat cherries? Sure (but NOT the pits, leaves, or stems)

It’s best not to feed your dogs cherries. Even though the flesh is safe, the pits, leaves, and stems are not. Cherries are so small the risk of your dog ingesting the pit is high so it’s better to choose a different snack (try blueberries or apples).

That being said, cherries do have nutritional qualities. They contain vitamins (A, C, and E), antioxidants, fiber, iron, magnesium, folate and potassium. While these nutrients have great benefits, you can find them elsewhere (like in other fruits and vegetables).

WARNING: The pits, stems, and leaves of cherries are choking hazards and contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. If you do feed your dog cherries, please remove the pits, stems, and leaves first.

The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include difficulty breathing, panting, shock, dilated pupils, red mucous membranes (eg gums), and death. If you think your dog has consumed a pit, contact your veterinarian and watch out for these signs.


Can dogs eat coconut? Yes! (but NOT the husk)

Coconut meat, coconut oil, and coconut milk are all safe (and nutritious) for your dog. Coconut contains lauric acid, which boosts the immune system and albumin, which promotes red blood cell formation. It can help clear up skin conditions, relieve arthritis, and help with allergies. You can even rub the oil on superficial cuts to promote healing. Coconuts are rich in healthy fats, but too much can cause an upset stomach so feed in moderation.

WARNING: Coconut husks pose a choking hazard and the hairs can get caught and irritate your dog. So when you feed your dog coconuts, stick to the meat, milk, and oil.


Can dogs eat cranberries? Yes!

Cranberries are very beneficial for humans, but are they for dogs as well? They do contain a lot of nutrients like antioxidants, fiber, manganese, and vitamins (A, B1, B2, and C). But they are often difficult for dogs to digest. Their tart flavor is not very appealing to canines and the excess sugar in sweetened cranberries is very unhealthy for your pup. Some people believe that they can help cure urinary tract infections, but this isn’t proven. So cranberries are probably not the best choice as a snack, but if your dog loves them, then a few as a treat every once in awhile is just fine.


Can dogs eat dates? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

Is your dog begging for a taste of the dates on your plate? It’s ok to let her try it. Dates are safe for dogs as long as you remove the pit first. They actually contain some really good stuff like vitamins (A, B1, B2, B3, B5, and C), minerals (iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese), and fiber. They are also low in fat and cholesterol. Dates are loaded with sugar and too much sugar is bad for dogs so keep it to just a little taste here and there. They can also be difficult to digest so that’s another reason to feed in moderation.

WARNING: Date pits contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. Make sure to remove the pit before feeding the date to your dog.

The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include difficulty breathing, panting, shock, dilated pupils, red mucous membranes (eg gums), and death. If you think your dog has consumed a pit, contact your veterinarian and watch out for these signs.


Can dogs eat eggplants? Sure (but NOT the leaves and monitor them afterward)

The eggplant is a member of the nightshade family, along with the tomato so it is not uncommon for dogs to be allergic to them. They also contain alpha-tomatine, which can be toxic to the heart, but experts disagree if it causes any danger to dogs. Considering these two facts, it might be smart to try another snack for your pooch. But if you do want try eggplant, it does have some nutritional benefits. It’s a great source of vitamins (B6 and K) and minerals (iron, potassium, calcium, niacin, and folate). It also contains fiber and phytonutrients. So if you do feed your dog eggplant, do it in moderation and monitor them for side effects afterward.

WARNING: Dogs can have adverse reactions to eggplants so monitor them for side effects after you feed them. Also, never feed them the leaves because these are toxic to dogs.


Can dogs eat figs? Sure (but monitor them afterward)

Figs are delicious so wouldn’t your dog enjoy them too? Figs are generally safe for dogs, though some dogs have allergic reactions so watch out for symptoms if you give your dog figs. Symptoms can include itchy skin, rash, wheezing, etc. Figs also contain nutritional benefits such as fiber and potassium. As with all fruits, remember to feed in moderation as canine digestive systems sometimes have trouble with an abundance of fiber and this can lead to upset stomachs and loose stool.


Can dogs eat grapefruit? No!

Grapefruits (like all citrus fruits) are toxic to dogs due to their psoralens and essential oils, according to the ASPCA. They can suffer from symptoms such as depression, vomiting, diarrhea, and photosensitivity. Besides, grapefruits are sour and acidic so it is highly unlikely that your dog will want to eat it anyway. Have you ever seen someone stick a lemon in front of a dog’s nose? They want no part of that. (Please don’t try this on your dog; it’s just mean). If your dog does ingest grapefruit, call your vet.


Can dogs eat grapes or raisins? No!

You should never feed your dog grapes or raisins (dried grapes). Though the exact cause remains unknown, grapes can be very toxic to dogs. Not all dogs are affected negatively by grapes, but the risks are too great to ignore. Ingesting grapes can lead to weakness, lethargy, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, anuria (cessation of urine), and acute kidney failure, which can lead to death. This is not something to take lightly. Please keep all grapes and raisins away from your dogs.


Can dogs eat honeydew melon? Yes! (but NOT the seeds)

There’s nothing like a cold, juicy slice of honeydew melon on a sunny summer day. Don’t you think your dog would like to try it? Sure! Honeydew melons are safe for dogs. They even have some beneficial nutrients including vitamins (A, B6, and C), potassium, magnesium, and fiber. Like all fruits, the fiber content may be too much for your dog’s tummy so feed in small doses to avoid an upset stomach.

WARNING: Seeds of honeydew melons contain cyanide (like many other fruits), which is toxic to dogs. Remember to scoop out seeds and only feed your dog the flesh of the melon.


Can dogs eat kiwi? Yes!

I have yet to meet a dog that actually likes kiwi, but if your dog does, then great! Kiwis are safe for dogs to consume, just make sure you peel off that uncomfortable fuzzy skin first. They offer some great nutrients including folate, fiber, and vitamins (C, E, and K). Because of their sweetness and fiber content, it’s best to feed in moderation as kiwis can be difficult on a canine digestive system. A small bit here and there won’t hurt your pup one bit.


Can dogs eat lemons? No!

Not only do dogs find the taste offensive, lemons are actually toxic to dogs. The culprits are the essential oils and psoralens. If ingested, your dog can experience sensitivity to light, depression, vomiting, and diarrhea. In the past, people have found it amusing to feed lemons to their dogs and videotape their reactions, but this is cruel. It’s not funny to feed dogs something toxic.


Can dogs eat limes? No!

As with lemons, limes are toxic to dogs due to their essential oils and psoralens. Their sour and acidic taste is not appealing to dogs anyway. There is no reason to feed your dog a lime and plenty of reasons not to. If ingested, your dogs can experience sensitivity to light, depression, vomiting, and diarrhea.


Can dogs eat mangos? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

Mangos are delicious and nutritious, but should you share them with your dog? Yes, your dog can safely eat the flesh of a mango, but first remove the skin, leaves, and pit as these can be dangerous to your dog. Mango contain great nutrients like alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, vitamins (A, B6, C, and E), antioxidants, fiber, potassium, and pectin. Like any other fruit, it’s best to give your dogs small pieces sparingly as the fiber makes it difficult to digest and the high sugar levels aren’t good for your dog.

WARNING: Mango pits contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. Also, due to its size, the pit is a choking hazard and it could also cause an obstruction in the digestive tract. Be sure to remove the pit, leaves, and skin before feeding your dog mangos. They should only be eating the flesh.


Can dogs eat nectarines? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

Nectarines fall under the pitted fruit category so the most important thing to do is to throw out the pit! It is dangerous to your dog. The flesh of a nectarine is delicious and nutritious so you can share a piece or two with your dog. It contains vitamins (A, C, E, and K), iron, calcium, fiber, and potassium.

WARNING: Nectarine pits are choking hazards and they contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. Remove the pit before feeding to your dog.

The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include difficulty breathing, panting, shock, dilated pupils, red mucous membranes (eg gums), and death. If you think your dog has consumed a pit, contact your veterinarian and watch out for these signs.


Can dogs eat olives? Sure (but NOT the pit)

Technically olives are not toxic to dogs, but there are a few things to consider. Most of the olives you purchase from the grocery store are going to be high in sodium and may have extra ingredients that are unhealthy or even toxic to your dog (like onions and garlic). Only feed your dog plain, unsalted olives. And remember to remove the pits first as they can be harmful to your dog. The benefits of olives are their vitamins (A, E, and K), as well as their calcium and protein.


Can dogs eat oranges? Sure (but NOT the rind)

Unlike lemons, limes, and grapefruits, oranges are not toxic to dogs. The pith and rind are very hard to digest, so if you feed your dog an orange, make sure you peel it first. Also the high acidity can upset your dog’s digestive system and cause diarrhea. Oranges may not be the best snack for dogs. Maybe try apples or berries. However, there are nutritional benefits, like vitamin C, thiamine, folate, and potassium.


Can dogs eat peaches? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

Peaches are another one of those pesky pitted fruits. The pits are dangerous to your dog, so make sure you remove them first and only feed your dog the flesh of the peach. That being said, peaches can be a yummy little treat for your pup. They have great nutrients, like vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, and antioxidants. Too much fiber is tough on the digestive tract, so stick with small portions.

WARNING: Peach pits contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs, and present a choking hazard. Always remove the pit and only feed your dog the flesh of the peach.

The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include difficulty breathing, panting, shock, dilated pupils, red mucous membranes (eg gums), and death. If you think your dog has consumed a pit, contact your veterinarian and watch out for these signs.


Can dogs eat pears? Yes! (but NOT the seeds or core)

Pears are very similar to apples when it comes to dogs. They make a great, healthy snack with nutritional benefits. They contain vitamins (A, B1, B2, C, E, and K), copper, potassium, folic acid, pectin, fiber, and antioxidants. If your dog likes the taste, then use pieces of pear as treats! Just remember to remove the seeds and core first.

WARNING: Pear seeds contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. They contain low doses of cyanide, nevertheless, it’s important to remove the seeds before feeding to your dog. Also remove the core as it’s a choking hazard.


Can dogs eat pineapples? Yes! (but NOT the skin or core)

Pineapples are tangy and refreshing. Not all dogs like the taste, but if your dog does, then you can treat her with it and not worry about it harming her as it is not toxic to dogs. However, small pieces are the way to go because of the high sugar content, acidity, and fiber. Too much pineapple can cause an upset stomach. And remember to remove the skin, leaves, and core as these can be harmful to your dog. Pineapples contain great nutrients such as vitamins (B1, B6, and C), fiber, folate, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, iron, magnesium, and manganese.

If your dog is eating feces, pineapple may be able to help. The problem could be that your dogs is not absorbing nutrients properly. Pineapple has bromelain that aids in protein digestion. There also is a theory that consuming pineapple makes their feces taste bad so they are discouraged from eating it.


Can dogs eat plums? Yes! (but NOT the pit)

Add plums to the list of pitted fruits. Plum pits are toxic and dangerous to dogs. The flesh, on the other hand, is delicious, nutritious, and safe for dogs to consume. So if you want to use plums as a treat, go ahead! Just remember to remove the pit first. Plums are a good source of vitamins (C and K), iron, fiber, potassium, and antioxidants. Remember, fruit can be hard for dogs to digest so only give your dogs a small amount at a time.

WARNING: Plum pits contain cyanide, which is toxic to dogs. They are also choking hazards and can cause an obstruction if ingested.

The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include difficulty breathing, panting, shock, dilated pupils, red mucous membranes (eg gums), and death. If you think your dog has consumed a pit, contact your veterinarian and watch out for these signs.


Can dogs eat pomegranates? Sure (but NOT the rind or membrane)

While pomegranates are not technically toxic to dogs, it’s probably best to avoid them. It turns out that pomegranates are hard for canines to digest so they often end up with tummy problems and may vomit or have diarrhea. Pomegranates do have some great nutrients like potassium, fiber, vitamin C, folic acid, and antioxidants, however a dog’s system doesn’t absorb them very well, so they aren’t reaping the nutritious rewards like humans do. Some dogs are fine eating pomegranate, but many experience discomfort, so this is a treat best left to the two-legged members of the family. As a side note, if you do feed your dog pomegranate, remove the rind and membrane first as these are even more difficult for your dog to digest.


Can dogs eat raspberries? Yes!

Raspberries are a great treat for dogs. Just ask my pup who picks them right off bush in our backyard. All the ones at knee-height and below are gone as soon as they’re ripe. Raspberries are wonderful because they are low in sugar and high in nutrients like vitamins (B-complex, C, and K), folic acid, fiber, antioxidants, potassium, magnesium, iron, copper, and manganese. As with any fruit, make sure you don’t give your dog too many because she might end up with the runs, but you don’t have to worry about any serious problems.


Can dogs eat strawberries? Yes!

Strawberries are another good treat for dogs. It’s best to remove the top (stem and leaves) first. If you freeze them first, they can be delicious, refreshing treats on a hot day. They have some great nutrients including vitamins (B1, B6, C, and K), fiber, antioxidants, folic acid, and omega-3 fatty acids. They even contain an enzyme that can help whiten your dog’s teeth. But remember, everything in moderation, especially fruit. Dogs don’t digest large amounts of plants well so a couple small pieces here and there is the way to go.


Can dogs eat tomatoes? Sure (but NOT the leaves, stems, or vines and monitor them afterward)

Tomatoes are members of the nightshade family and they therefore contain tomatine and solanine, which are toxic to dogs. However, it is the leaves, stems, and vines that contain high amounts of these substances. The fruit itself contains very little tomatine and solanine. Additionally, if ingested, not much of these substances is absorbed. So if you give your dog a piece of tomato, it is unlikely that she will have adverse effects. But remember to keep the amount small. Tomatoes have benefits as well since they contain antioxidants, vitamins (A, B3, B6, and C), fiber, manganese, phosphorus, and potassium. It’s also possible for dogs to be allergic to tomatoes, in which case they will exhibit symptoms such as rashes, itching, and hotspots.

WARNING: Tomato vines, stems, and leaves contain toxic substances for dogs. Symptoms of poisoning include difficulty breathing, elevated heart rate, excess drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, dilated pupils, and weakness. Contact your vet immediately if your dog exhibits any of these symptoms.


Can dogs eat watermelon? Yes! (but NOT the seeds or rind)

Watermelon is personally my favorite fruit. It is sweet, refreshing, and hydrating and your dog can have some too! Watermelon has great nutrients like vitamins (A, B6, and C), potassium, and magnesium, not to mention it’s mostly water so it can help your dog stay hydrated. You should always have fresh water accessible to your dog (especially when it’s warm out), but watermelon provides a nice bonus of hydration. Just remember to remove the seeds (seedless is a good way to go) and throw out the rind. Watermelon seeds are hard to digest and can cause intestinal blockages. Watermelon rinds are extremely difficult for your dog to digest so if you feed her the rind, you’re pretty much dooming her to a tummy ache and all that follows (diarrhea, vomiting). Don’t do it. Just give her the juicy red flesh.


Vegetables

Can dogs eat asparagus? Sure

Asparagus is safe for dogs to eat, but the fern is not. Do not let your dogs near the fern because if they ingest it, the toxin sapogenin can cause serious gastric upset. Asparagus itself is fun of nutrients like folate, fiber, copper, iron, antioxidants, and vitamins (B1, B2, and K). However, many of these nutrients are lost when you cook asparagus and feeding it raw makes it difficult for dogs to digest. There is no real benefit to feeding your dog asparagus. And you run the risk of a smelly household as asparagus can often cause smelly urine or gas.

WARNING: Ferns associated with asparagus are toxic to dogs. They contain the toxin sapogenin, which causes intestinal problems.


Can dogs eat broccoli? Yes!

Broccoli is a great treat for dogs. My dog loves it! She won’t eat the florets, but she loves gnawing on the stem. Broccoli is full of wonderful nutrients like vitamins (A, K, and C), manganese, bioflavonoids, fiber, and antioxidants. They can also help keep your dog’s teeth clean, though it’s not a substitute for brushing. You can give your dog broccoli raw or cooked. BUT keep the amount small. Broccoli contains isothiocyanate, which is potentially toxic to dogs. It’s a gastric irritant, but you don’t have to worry about it unless your dog ingests a large amount of broccoli.


Can dogs eat carrots? Yes!

Carrots are a fun treat for your dog. You can feed them to your dog raw or cooked. Raw carrots are fun to chew on and can help keep your dog’s teeth clean, but they contain a lot of cellulose. Dogs cannot digest cellulose so they won’t get any of the nutrient benefits. Cooked carrots don’t have the dental benefits, but your dog will get the nutritious vitamins (A, B1, B6, C, D, E, and K), beta-carotene, and fiber.

Remember, everything in moderation. The high levels of sugar and fiber in carrots can cause gas and gastric upset if you give your dog too many carrots. So use carrots as a fun treat every so often, just not too much.


Can dogs eat celery? Yes! (but be sure to chop it into small pieces)

Celery is full of great nutrients like vitamins (A, B1, B2, B6, and C), fiber, potassium, sodium, folic acid, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, and amino acids. Some dogs like celery and some don’t. If you do give your dog celery, you can give it raw or cooked, just be sure to cut it into small pieces. The strings of the celery present a dangerous choking hazard. It is best to remove the stringy parts as well.

If your dog does like celery and you choose to use it as a treat, remember to keep the pieces small and the amount low. The high fiber can be difficult to digest. As a bonus you may notice that a little bit of celery can keep your dog from having stinky breath!












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About the Author Anna

Anna is a canine enthusiast. She loves everything about dogs from their loyalty to their energetic spirits to their stubborn moments. She has a passion to learn everything she can to become a better "dog-mom" to her Toller, Penny, and to share her knowledge of dogs with all who are interested in the hopes of educating people on the best canine care.

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